How Tall Is A Power Rack? List Of Best Racks For Home Gyms


Are you wondering if you can fit a power rack under your home gym ceiling? This post will help you figure out how tall a power rack is and which one is best for you.

How tall is a power rack? The average height of a power rack for home use is 84” The majority of power racks ranges from 81” to 86” although some are as tall as 91” or as short as 71.5”. Getting a lower power rack doesn’t have many drawbacks as long as the person using it doesn’t hit his/her head on the top bar.

There are a lot more details about the sizes of power racks. Keep reading to find out the exact heights of many popular power racks for home use.

Just want to find a good rack for your home gym? Click here to find my favorite.


Power rack dimensions

Looking at a single rack isn’t going to be very helpful if you want to know if a power rack fits under your ceiling. Not all racks are the same and not all ceilings are the same.

To make things a bit clearer here is a chart of the dimensions of many popular power racks. The dimensions listed in the chart are the outside dimensions.

BrandModelHeight (in)Width (in)Depth (in) 
Titan FitnessT-2 Short71.55848
Titan FitnessT-283.0048.0048.00
Titan FitnessT-3 Short82.2553.2544.75
Titan FitnessT-391.1253.2544.75
Titan FitnessX3 Short82.0048.0050.00
Titan FitnessX392.0048.0050.00
RogueRML-390C90.3755340
RogueRML-490C90.3755353
RogueR-3 Shorty845334
RogueR-3 Standard905334
CAPFull Cage Rack 6'7243.6547.5
CAPFull Cage Rack 7'8443.6547.5
Body-SolidBFPR100834745
TDSPower rack82.54848
REP FitnessPR1000844848
REP FitnessPR1100844847.5
Fitness RealityX-Class86.55286
Fitness Reality810XLT83.546.550.5
HulkFit1000814744
PapababePower rack894747
Average84.3149.5647.88

As you can see in that chart, the average height of a power rack is about 84 inches. But, as is always the problem with averages, not many racks measure exactly 84 in height. Quite a few are a couple of inches off but there are also a few that are way shorter or taller than the average 84”.

The tallest power rack is the full size Titan X3. This rack tops out at 92 inches which is really quite tall. The Titan T-3 isn’t far off with 91 1/8 inches of height. Most standard size Rogue racks are about 90” tall which isn’t exactly short either.

On the short end of the scale we’ve got the racks that are often labeled as “short” or “shorty”. These are significantly shorter in general although they are of course shorter than their normal counterparts. If we look at the Rogue R-3 for example, the standard version is 90” tall while the short version still measures 84”. So in that case the short version is still as tall as the average. So just shopping for a “short” power rack isn’t going to guarantee it fits under a low ceiling.

The shortest racks on this list are the Titan T-2 Short and Cap Full Power Cage 6’. Both of those are significantly shorter than the average at 71.5” and 72” respectively. That’s not only much shorter than the average of 84” but also the only two racks that are under 80” tall.

Out of the 19 racks on this list, those are the only two under 80”. All the other racks measure from 81” to 92” tall. That means that if you’re dealing with very low ceilings the Titan T-2 and Cap 6’ power rack are your best options. So if you’ve got 6’ – 6.5’ tall ceilings to deal with, those are your choices.

Out of those two choices, the Titan Fitness T-2 is the best choice. It’s higher quality, sturdier, a bit roomier and there are a ton of add-ons available for a reasonable price.


Want to take all the guess work out of building a home gym in limited space? My eBook will tell and show you exactly what you want to know.


Power racks for low ceilings

If you care about the height of a power rack, you likely have to deal with low ceilings. So which power racks are suitable for you if you’ve got low ceilings?

Find out more about why I recommend the Titan T-2 for home gyms


6’ ceilings

6’ – 6.5’ ceilings are not too common but not impossible, especially if you’ve got some kind of gym flooring which takes up extra headroom.

If you’re in the unlucky position to have to deal with those heights of ceilings you don’t have much choice The Titan T-2 and Cap 6’ power rack are your best options since they’re the only ones short enough. So if you’ve got 6’ – 6.5’ tall ceilings to deal with, those are your choices.

Out of those two choices, the Titan Fitness T-2 is the best choice. It’s higher quality, sturdier, a bit roomier and there are a ton of add-ons available for a reasonable price.

Find out more about why I recommend the Titan T-2 for home gyms


7’ Ceilings

Many home gyms are built in the garage or basement. Especially the basement often has lower ceilings than optimal. 7’ ceilings are not uncommon for spaces that are often used for home gyms. 7’ translates to 84” which is, probably not incidentally, very close to the average height of a power rack.

For people dealing with 7’ tall ceilings, a power rack that is under 84”. It’s not advisable to get a rack that is exactly the same height as your ceilings since you still have to be able to move it around. It’s not supposed to become an integral part of your house.

The suitable power racks for 7’ tall ceilings are;

  • Titan T-2 (83”)
  • X3 Short (82”)
  • Body Solid BFPR100 (83”)
  • TDS Full Rack (82.5”)
  • Fitness Reality 810XLT (83.5”)
  • Hulkfit 1000 (81”)

Make sure to measure the height of your ceilings very carefully. All houses are a little different so don’t assume it’ll be ok. You don’t want to buy a power rack and discover that you’re missing half an inch of headroom.

Also, when measuring and shopping for a power rack, keep in mind that you might still put gym flooring down. Gym flooring can take up from ½ to 1 inch of height depending on the type.

Out of the choices above, the Titan T-2 or X3 Short are the best options. They provide great value for money and maybe even more importantly, there are tons of add-ons available like dip handles, pulleys, extra hooks, etc.

Find out more about why I recommend the Titan T-2 for home gyms


Pros and Cons of short power racks

Are there any drawbacks to getting a short power rack? Yes, there are a few;


Overhead pressing

You might have to do the Overhead Press outside the rack. This is not a huge deal and, if you’re ceilings are low, you might not even be able to get the weight fully above your head because you’ll hit the ceiling.


Pull ups

However, if you’ve already got low ceilings, a shorter power rack could allow you to still do pull ups. To do pull ups properly you need about 18” of headroom above the pull up bar. The pull up bar is usually one of the top braces of a power rack so it’s very close to the top.

Getting a lower rack than you can fit could give you the extra headroom you need to be able to do pull ups.


Other exercises

Most other exercises won’t be a problem. As long as you don’t hit anything you’re good. And with most exercises this isn’t going to be likely. On squats the bar goes a little higher than your shoulders so only giants will have issues.

Deadlifts are done outside the rack anyways; Lunges are very similar to squats although you need a bit more depth but not height. Bench presses are done on a bench so much lower.


How tall are you?

The final thing to worry about is your own height. Simply because you don’t want to hit your head on the top brace when walking into the rack or when coming up from a squat. If you’re 6’1 and the pull up bar on your rack is at exactly 6’, you will hit your head at some point no matter how careful you are. (Guess how I know…)


Related questions

How much headroom do you need for pull ups? To do pull ups properly, (bar to chest) you need about 18” of headroom above the pull up bar. To just get your chin above the bar 12” would be enough. This is a little more than you strictly need but, you don’t want the top of your head to touch the ceiling at the top of a pull up.


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Matt

Hey, I'm Matt. Welcome to HomeGymResource.com. I've been going to the gym for about 15 years and am now looking to build my own. In the process I've learned many things I'd like to share with you.

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